Realistic Teen Fiction

Young adult readers often think it’s important to know that they aren’t alone in the human experience. When checking out the titles in our realistic teen fiction category, you’ll find books that speak to issues that many teens deal with on a daily basis. From living in foster homes and experiencing abuse to eating disorders and the trials of growing up, these examples of ya realistic fiction – and others – can all be found here. You’ll also find reviews of books that focus on both the good and the bad of mother-daughter or father-son relationships and other relationships. Check out our current offerings and come back often to see what other problem novels and books about family relationships we read next!

Just Breathe by Cammie McGovern

Just Breathe by Cammie McGovern

It’s about two characters who are holding onto life as best they can, but their experiences with CF and depression put them both in a kind of liminal space between life and death, much like the characters in David’s favourite movie, Wings of Desire. While they are very much alive, their chronic illnesses put them a lot closer to death than anyone else they know, and this means that as their friendship grows, they are able to have deep and meaningful conversations on topics that most teens would be incapable of talking about in depth and, likely, really uncomfortable discussing, like David’s girlfriend Sharon. Read more →

Love a la Mode by Stephanie Kate Strohm

Love à la Mode by Stephanie Kate Strohm

Buy Love à la Mode Regular price $9.99 Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers / Disney-Hyperion / Listening Library Format: Paperback / eBook / Audiobook Narrator: Stephanie Kate Strohm, the author Reviewer: Melissa on May 30, 2020 Rating: 3 out of 5 stars From the moment I saw the cute cover and read the synopsis on the Libby App, I… Read more →

Every Reason We Shouldn't by Sara Fujimura

Every Reason We Shouldn’t by Sara Fujimura

Olivia is flawed. She has outbursts that are basically juvenile tantrums, and she gets jealous over her boyfriend’s talent when she isn’t sure that she has what it takes. She’s not perfect, but honestly, neither is Jonah. He lies to his parents, sneaks around, yells at his parents, and sometimes says terrible things to Olivia. Yes, he apologized immediately for the last bit, but still it kind of sucked. And yet, I didn’t see criticism of his maturity level anywhere on Goodreads, so I tend to think it’s because we put female characters at a higher, unfair standard, even if we’re women ourselves. Plus, let’s be honest, Jonah has great parents and Olivia’s basically leave her to fend for herself and to worry about the growing pile of last due bills without ever talking to her about it or reassuring her. If anyone has reason to yell at her parents, it’s her. Read more →