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#BellLetsTalk Day: Recommended Books on Anxiety

I wanted to write something for #BellLetsTalk Day this year, too. However, instead of sharing a list of additional titles that are good portrayals of a variety of mental illness representations, I thought I would focus on recommended books with anxiety representation. For many people, I think situational anxiety has become more of an issue due to the fears and uncertainty regarding COVID-19. Read more →

You Have a Match

You Have a Match by Emma Lord

While You Have a Match is cute, it wasn’t quite as cute and fluffy as Tweet Cute was. It’s a lot more angsty and drama-filled, which makes sense for the circumstances of the novel, but it definitely wasn’t the kind of book I was expecting because the romance definitely takes a backseat to the family drama. Lord does a good job of exploring the complications and questions that come up from finding full, and presumably half, siblings or other family members via a DNA test. Moreover, it’s a timely book because this kind of thing is happening more and more often as DNA testing becomes ubiquitous in society. Read more →

Into the Heartless Wood

Into the Heartless Wood by Joanna Ruth Meyer

Monstrosity becomes something that you choose to be, not something that you are innately. And it’s not something that correlates to one’s physical appearance—even human beings can be monsters if they have an evil intention or actions. That said, it’s not as simple as Owen changing his perspective. In addition, Meyer uses Mary Shelley’s trick from Frankenstein by allowing Seren to tell part of the story through her own POV. By giving Seren a voice and an internal monologue, Meyer ensures that the audience will develop sympathy for the tree siren at the same time that Owen begins to sympathize with her. Read more →