Tag Archive for YA Book Reviews

alchemys-daughter-by-mary-a-osborne

Alchemy’s Daughter by Mary A. Osborne

Finally, this award-winning novel speaks to the experience of loss and grief in a way that will resonate with both teen and adult readers, even ones like myself, who typically shy away from this historical period. It reminds us that we can wallow in the darkness of despair when we lose the one we love or when someone we know dies, but when we’re able to find a way to move forward authentically, there will be something beautiful around the corner, even if it is only our own, personal growth.

For these reasons and many more than I can delineate in this review, Alchemy’s Daughter is one that will continue to resonate with me for a long time coming just like the earlier book in the Alchemy Series. Read more →

whatever-life-throws-at-you-by-julie-cross

Whatever Life Throws At You by Julie Cross

From strong parental figures and a believable exploration of major league sports to a steamy romance, Whatever Life Throws At You won’t make you turn pages as quickly as Brody’s fast ball or Annie’s mile or two mile runs, but it’ll be pretty close. Add in the tension-filled plot twists included in the novel, and you’ll have a really good story featuring a diverse and intersectional love interest. Read more →

suicide-notes-from-beautiful-girls

Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls by Lynn Weingarten

I thought Suicide Notes From Beautiful Girls would be a story about friendship and the grief that only the tragic loss of a young person to suicide can evoke, but it really isn’t a tearjerker. Instead, readers of this dark, atmospheric novel should get ready for a page turner with an ending that you’ll never see coming. Read more →

rose-under-fire-by-elizabeth-wein

Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

If you still haven’t read Rose Under Fire, then pick it up today. Wein brings back the themes that readers have grown to love about her novel, Code Name Verity, and even gives us glimpses of some of our favorite characters, like Maddie. While the main characters may be fictionalizations, readers of historical fiction, in general, and YA historical novels, in particular, will appreciate the factual truth of everything Wein shares about one of the darkest periods in the 20th century. Read more →